Spine Surgery

The treatment of spinal conditions requires an integrated approach using the expertise from neurosurgeons, nurses, therapists and other healthcare professionals. At Tallahassee Memorial, we perform advanced interventions through a wide variety of comprehensive spinal surgeries.

Procedures

The most common spinal surgeries offered at Tallahassee Memorial include:

Minimally Invasive Surgery

When appropriate, we strongly support the use of minimally invasive surgery. Using modern surgical operating microscopes in our surgical procedures allows us to make smaller surgical incisions while maintaining the best possible visualization. Patients who receive minimally invasive surgery generally become active and resume their normal activities quicker than those who have traditional surgery.

Laminectomy

A Laminectomy involves removing all, or a portion of, the spinal lamina (the back part of the spinal column). This procedure can be performed for many different reasons, including spinal decompression and to gain access to the spinal cord for the removal of spinal cord lesions.

Discectomy

A discectomy is the surgical removal of all, or a portion of, one of spinal discs. The discs are the structures located between the spinal vertebral bodies. A fibrous ligament called the annulus surrounds the disc itself. Most commonly, a disc is removed if it has herniated or ruptured through the annulus and is pinching the surrounding nerves. This can cause pain or other problems. Sometimes, a severely bulging disc will also pinch a nerve and need to be removed. Occasionally, severely degenerated discs will cause pain and also need removal.

 

Spinal Fusion & Reconstruction

Spinal fusion and reconstruction may be necessary for a great variety of reasons, including disc herniations, traumatic spinal injuries, congenital and degenerative spinal conditions and for removal of tumors. These conditions may cause pain and neurological injuries, but they can often be treated successfully.

Spinal Cord Tumors & Other Lesions

Tumors of the spinal cord are rare, but quite challenging. Tumors can develop inside or outside of the spinal cord. Tumors located outside the cord can press upon the spinal cord, but either type of tumor can cause spinal cord injury. Treatment often requires surgical biopsy or excision, followed occasionally by radiation therapy.

Kyphoplasty

Kyphoplasty involves a small incision in the back through which the neurosurgeon inserts a narrow tube to position a balloon in place. Once inflated, the balloon elevates the fracture and the fractured pieces return to a more normal position. Polymethlmethacrylate (a cement-like substance) is then inserted to harden and stabilize the bone.

Cervical Arthroplasty

An arthroplasty is an operation to either restore, as closely as possible, or preserve the integrity and functional power of a disc using artificial implants or the creation of an artificial disc. An artificial disc is inserted between two cervical vertebrae after the degenerated disc has been surgically removed. When artificial implants are placed, they are permanent.

A cervical arthroplasty is performed on the upper spine (neck area) to relieve pressure and pain on the spinal cord and/or on the nerve roots.

Lumbar Arthroplasty

An arthroplasty is an operation to either restore, as closely as possible, or preserve the integrity and functional power of a disc using artificial implants or the creation of an artificial disc. An artificial disc is inserted between two lumbar vertebrae after the degenerated disc has been surgically removed. When artificial implants are placed, they are permanent.

A lumbar arthroplasty is performed on the lower spine to relieve pressure and pain in the low back area, including the cauda equine and/or on the nerve roots.

Vertebroplasty

This simple outpatient procedure can provide almost immediate relief of pain, improve your mobility, and often help you avoid spine surgery. Clinically known as Percutaneous Vertebroplasty, the procedure involves injecting a cement-like substance into your spine to reinforce collapsing vertebrae.